Shakespeare: Comedies, Tragedies, Histories & Sonnets

Dr Marco Liviero


Shakespeare: Comedies, Tragedies, Histories & Sonnets

Instant Access

21 video lessons (3 hours)

Engage directly with Marco via our on demand Q&A

Join the discussion via our online community


WATCH TRAILER

BUY COURSE (£60)

Video lessons

Course Introduction - It All Begins With a Book

Lesson 1

Course Introduction - It All Begins With a Book

“When we read Shakespeare we read ourselves.” Marco describes how he fell in love with Shakespeare and what Shakespeare can teach us about ourselves.

Comedies: Introduction

Lesson 2

Comedies: Introduction

We look at comedy as a genre, its classical structure and how Shakespeare alters that structure.

Comedies: A Midsummer Night's Dream - The Dangerous Illusion of Love

Lesson 3

Comedies: A Midsummer Night's Dream - The Dangerous Illusion of Love

We delve into the role of magic and the supernatural in comedy and consider the dangerous illusion of love.

Comedies: Twelfth Night - Love Seriously

Lesson 4

Comedies: Twelfth Night - Love Seriously

The many types of love and how they don't fit naturally into comedy, but do illustrate life and humanity.

Comedies: The Tempest - The Sense of an Ending

Lesson 5

Comedies: The Tempest - The Sense of an Ending

''As you from crimes would pardon'd be, Let your indulgence set me free.''

Tragedies: Introduction

Lesson 6

Tragedies: Introduction

Marco considers how tragedies are defined and how Shakespeare challenges expectations in his tragedies.

Tragedies: Hamlet - The Everyman

Lesson 7

Tragedies: Hamlet - The Everyman

Why Hamlet's tale is universal and reflects our own confusion at the nature of our existence.

Tragedies: King Lear - An Old Man's Tale

Lesson 8

Tragedies: King Lear - An Old Man's Tale

We look at how Lear's story tells us the truth, simply and mercilessly, about the confusing nature of human existence.

Tragedies: Macbeth - A Tragedy of Love

Lesson 9

Tragedies: Macbeth - A Tragedy of Love

We explore the nature of desire and temptation and consider whether this is Shakespeare's most nihilistic tragedy.

Histories: Introduction

Lesson 10

Histories: Introduction

Marco considers how Shakespeare deals with truth, power and why we need a crown as well as how we should judge the past.

Histories: Henry V - Harry the Man; Henry the King

Lesson 11

Histories: Henry V - Harry the Man; Henry the King

Why Henry V goes beyond idealistic propaganda and how history can be manipulated. We consider the nature of power.

Histories: Richard III - Falling in Love with Evil

Lesson 12

Histories: Richard III - Falling in Love with Evil

Marco considers how evil can be seductive and how Richard III and Henry V are more similar than they appear.

Sonnets: Introduction - To Hear With Eyes

Lesson 13

Sonnets: Introduction - To Hear With Eyes

We consider the form of the sonnet and how Shakespeare makes the form his own.

Sonnets: Romeo & Juliet's Sonnet of Love

Lesson 14

Sonnets: Romeo & Juliet's Sonnet of Love

Why this is the perfect love sonnet where two voices merge in complete harmony in a world of conflict.

Sonnets: Sonnet II

Lesson 15

Sonnets: Sonnet II

''This were to be new made when thou art old, And see thy blood warm when thou feel'st it cold.''

Sonnets: Sonnet XX

Lesson 16

Sonnets: Sonnet XX

''But since she prick'd thee out for women's pleasure, Mine be thy love and thy love's use their treasure.''

Sonnets: Sonnet XXIII

Lesson 17

Sonnets: Sonnet XXIII

''O, learn to read what silent love hath writ: To hear with eyes belongs to love's fine wit.''

Sonnets: Sonnet XXIX

Lesson 18

Sonnets: Sonnet XXIX

''For thy sweet love remember'd such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings.''

Sonnets: Sonnet CXXX

Lesson 19

Sonnets: Sonnet CXXX

''And yet, by heaven, I think my love as rare As any she belied with false compare.''

Sonnets: Talking in Bed

Lesson 20

Sonnets: Talking in Bed

We look at Philip Larkin's sonnet 'Talking in Bed' and consider how it compares with Shakespeare's sonnets.

Course Conclusion

Lesson 21

Course Conclusion

''If all the world’s a stage, Shakespeare’s voices become our own.''


Buy this course:

Proceed to one-off payment for 12 months' access to this course.


BUY COURSE (£60)


Our newsletter:

Sign up to our newsletter to receive special offers, updates on new courses and insights on Big Ideas.

Online Shakespeare Discussion Forum

Course members can:

Ask Marco questions directly using the "Ask Marco" section in our community. Marco will provide a video response to your questions.
Share ideas and join the discussion about Shakespeare with fellow lovers of Shakespeare's work.

VIEW OUR COMMUNITY

Feedback For Our Courses

Our newsletter

Sign up to our newsletter to receive special offers, updates on new courses and insights on Big Ideas from our expert tutors.